Overview

Nepal with 1310 identified Himalayan peaks over 6000m including 8 out of 14 highest peaks in the world is unquestionably a premier mountaineering and climbing destination for thousands of climbers and mountaineers testing their skills and endurance and fulfilling their desire to summit a Himalayan peak and marvel at the world from its rooftop. Currently, there are 326 peaks open for climbing and mountaineering in Nepal.

Mountaineering expedition in Nepal has been a popular adventure sport all over the globe since Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay climbed Mount Everest in May 1953. The appeal of the Himalayas is irresistible to mountaineers, as the Himalayas are the highest and most difficult mountain range on earth. Their magnificent elegance, vastness, wonder, magic, and excitement will still appeal to those who are willing to move into this glorious area of the Himalayas.

The number of excited mountaineers who flock to the Himalayas is rising every year. If it's merely ascending a trekking peak or a complete mountaineering adventure on a 7000 or 8000 meter high. Joining the Himalayan expedition party has been a fantasy and the ultimate aim for many explorers and mountaineers.

Mountaineering expedition in Nepal has been a popular adventure sport all over the globe since Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay climbed Mount Everest in May 1953. The appeal of the Himalayas is irresistible to mountaineers, as the Himalayas are the highest and most difficult mountain range on earth. Their magnificent elegance, vastness, wonder, magic, and excitement will still appeal to those who are willing to move into this glorious area of the Himalayas.

The number of excited mountaineers who flock to the Himalayas is rising every year. If it's merely ascending a trekking peak or a complete mountaineering adventure on a 7000 or 8000 meter high. Joining the Himalayan expedition party has been a fantasy and the ultimate aim for many explorers and mountaineers.

Guests must therefore provide a minimum of expertise, training, and understanding of basic mountain climbing, scrambling steep snow and rock, safety methods, crevice rescue, and the capacity to understand the danger of possibly unsafe snow levels, landslide, and clinical indicators of exhaustion, altitude sickness, cold and hypothermia and quickly shifting weather conditions.

Mountaineering preparation is a continual and never-ending process; it is a way of life and involves continual practice, and mountaineering intuition must become second nature. A minor error or a lapse in focus may be fatal. The reward, though, is a stunning vision and an incredible impression of the lifetime achievement of being at the top of the summit.

Peaks opened for climbing

Mountains are part of natural resources, and most countries, including those rich in mineral resources, derive fees and revenue from special mountain climbing permits such as Denali in the USA or Aconcagua in Argentina. Nepalese government fees are an important part of export earnings.

New policies for climbing and mountaineering within Nepal have been developed by the Government of Nepal. Around the same time, new peaks were available for climbing. There are actually 326 mountain peaks available for hiking, including 20 royalty-free peaks. Climbing peaks have been classified into three categories: A, B, and C.

Category A:
There are 22 peaks open to Nepalese expeditions or joint Nepalese-Foreign expeditions consisting of at least 3 Nepalese members;
Category B:
Peaks open to Foreign expeditions only after they have been climbed by Nepalese or joint Nepalese-Foreign expedition;
Category C:
Unrestricted peaks open to any expedition.

22 Peaks opened for Nepalese expeditions or join Nepalese and foreign Expeditions consisting at least three Nepalese members

Number

Name of the Peak and Mountain

Altitude in Meter

Administrative Zone

1.

Hrikuti

6364M

Dhaulagiri

2.

Bhemdang Ri

6150M

Bagmati

3.

Bhairab Takura (Madiya Peak)

6799M

Bagmati

4.

Chamar

7187M

Gandaki

5.

Changla

6563M

Karnali

6.

Dorje Lhakpa

6966M

Bagmati

7.

Ganchenpo

6387 M

Bagmati

8.

Gandharava

6248 M

Gandaki

9.

Gurja Himal

7193 M

Dhaulagiri

10.

Ri Gurkarpa

6891 M

Bagmati

11.

Kang Gyachung

7952M

Sagarmatha

12.

Gyalzen Peak

6151 M

Bagmati

13.

Jongsong Peak

7483 M

Mechi

14.

Karyolung

6511 M

Sagarmatha

15.

Kirat Chuli(Tent Peak)

7365 M

Bagmati

16.

Langtang Ri

7205 M

Bagmati

17.

Leonpa Gang (Big White Peak)

6979 M

Bagmati

18.

Nala Kankar

6062 M

Karnali

19.

Nepal Peak

6910 M

Mechi

20.

Ohmi Kanga

6829 M

Mechi

21.

Phurbi Chyachu

6631 M

Bagmati

22.

Urknmang

6151 M

Bagmati

 

B. Peaks opened to foreign expeditions only when they have been climbed by Nepalese and foreign joint expedition

Number

Name of the Peak and Mountain

Altitude in Meter

Administrative Zone

1.

Bobaye

6808 M

Mahakali

2.

Ganesh (Yangra)

7429 M

Bagmati

3.

Jethi Bahurani

6850 M

Mahakali

4.

Khangsar Kang

7485 M

Gandaki

C. Peaks opened for foreign expeditions

Number

Name of the Peak and Mountain

Altitude in Meter

Administrative Zone

1.

Ama Dablam

6812M

Sagarmatha

2.

Annapurna I

8091M

Gandaki

3.

Annapurna II

7937 M

Gandaki

4.

Annapurna III

7555 M

Gandaki

5.

Annapurna IV

7525 M

Gandaki

6.

Annapurna South

7219 M

Gandaki

7.

Api Himal

7132 M

Mahakali

8.

Api West

7100 M

Darchula

9.

Barun Tse

7129 M

Kashi

10.

Baudha

6672 M

Gankdaki

11.

Chamlang

7319 M

Sagarmatha Barun

12.

Cheo Himal

6820 M

Gandaki

13.

Chobuje

6685 M

Janakpur

14.

Cholatse

6440 M

Sagarmatha

15.

Cho-oyu

8201 M

Sagarmatha

16.

Cho polu

6711 M

Sagarmatha

17.

Churen

7371 M

Dhaulagiri

18.

Dhampus

6012 M

Dhaulagiri

19.

Dhaulagiri I

8167 M

Dhaulagiri

20.

Dhaulagiri II

7751 M

Dhaulagari

21.

Dhaulagiri III

7715M

Dhaulagiri

22.

Dhaulagiri IV

7661 M

Dhaulagiri

23.

Drangang Ri

6801 M

Janakpur

24.

Dhaulagiri V

7618 M

Dhaulagiri

25.

Dhaulagiri IV

7268 M

Dhaulagiri

26.

Fimkot West

6645 M

Bajhang

27.

Fimkot

6697 M

Bajhang Humla

28.

Ganesh IV (Pabil)

7052 M

Bagmati

29.

Ganesh II

7111 M

Bagmati

30.

Ganesh III (Salasungo)

7110 M

Bagmati

31.

Ganesh V

6986 M

Bagmati

32.

Gangapurna

7455 M

Bagmati

33.

Gauri Shanker

7134 M

Janakpur

34.

Gimigela Chuli

7350 M

Mechi

35.

Gyajikang

7038 M

Gandaki

36.

Himachuli E

7893 M

Gandaki

37.

Himchuli N.

7371 M

Gandaki

38.

Himchuli West

7540 M

Gandaki

39.

Himlung Himal

7126 M

Gandaki

40.

Hongde

6556 M

Karnali

41.

Jagdula Peak

5763 M

Karnali

42.

Kumbhakarna (Jannu)

7710 M

Mechi

43.

Kangbachen

7903M

Mechi

44.

Kagmara

5960 M

Karnali

45.

Kande Hiunchuli

6627 M

Karnali

46.

Kanchenjunga (Main)

8586 M

Mechi

47.

Kanchenjunga

8476 M

Mechi

48.

Kanchenjunga(South)

8476 M

Mechi

49.

Kang Guru

6981 M

Gandaki

50.

Kangtega(Kantega)

6779 M

Sagarmatha

51.

Kanjeralwa

6612 M

Karnali

52.

Kanijiroba (Main Peak)

6838 M

Karnali

53.

Khatang

6782 M

Janakpur

54.

Lamjung Himal

6918 M

Gandaki

55.

Langsisa Ri

6427 M

Bagmati

56.

Langtang Lirung

7234 M

Bagmati

57.

Lhotse

8516 M

Sagarmatha

58.

Lhotse Shar

8400 M

Sagarmatha

59.

Lobuje West

6145 M

Sagarmatha

60.

Lemgpa Peak

6954 M

Mechi

61.

Makalu I

8463 M

Koshi

62.

Makalu II (Kangchugtse)

7678 M

Koshi

63.

Manapathi

6380 M

Dhaulagiri

64.

Manaslu

8163 M

Gandaki

65.

Manaslu North

7157 M

Gandaki

66.

Nampa

6755 M

Mahakali

67.

Ngojumbakang

7743 M

Sagarmatha

68.

Nilgiri Central

6940 M

Dhaulagiri

69.

Nilgiri North

7061 M

Dhaulagiri

70.

Nilgiri South

6839 M

Dhaulagiri

71.

Numbur

6957 M

Sagarmatha

72.

Nuptse

7855 M

Sagarmatha

73.

Ngadi Chuli (Peak 29 Dakura)

7871 M

Gandaki

74.

Nampa South

6580 M

Darchula/Bajhang

75.

Patrasi

6450 M

6450 Karnali

76.

Pumori

7161M

Sagarmatha

77.

Putha Hiunchuli

7246 M

Dhaulagiri

78.

Pathivara Chuli

7125 M

Mechi

79.

Pasang Lhamuh (Chuli Jasamba)

7351 M

Sagarmatha

80.

Raksha Urai

6593 M

Bajhang

81.

Saipal

7031 M

Mahakali

82.

Shanti Shikhar

7591 M

Sagarmatha/Khumbu

83.

Shartse

7459 M

Sagarmatha

84.

Sisne

5849 M

Karnali

85.

Sita Chuchura

6611 M

Dhaulagiri

86.

Saipal East

6882 M

Bajhang

87.

Surma-Sarovar North

6523 M

Bajhang

88.

Sagarmatha

8848 M

Sagarmatha

89.

Shey Shikhar

6139 M

Karnali

90.

Tawache

6501 M

Sagarmatha

91.

Thamserku

6623 M

Sagarmatha

92.

Tilicho peak

7134 M

Gandaki

93.

Tukuche Peak

6920 M

Dhaulagir

94.

Tripura Hiunchuli

6563 M

Karnali

95.

Tso Karpo

6518 M

Dolpa

96.

Tarke Kang

7193 M

Gandaki

97.

Varaha Shikhar (Fang)

7647 M

Dhaulagiri

98.

Yalung Kang

8505 M

Mechi

No Royalty Peaks

The Nepalese Government of Nepal has agreed to withhold royalties for the growth of such peaks. The Government has recently declared a partial and absolute exemption from royalties on the 60 mountain peaks of the Kingdom of Nepal. New announcements are made with a view to promoting the trekking and mountaineering field in conjunction with the destination Nepal Year 2002-003, the Golden Jubilee celebration of the successful ascent of Mount Everest, and the International Mountaineering Tourism Year 2011.

100% Royalty-Free Peaks and Mountain list in Nepal

Number

Name of the Peak and Mountain

Altitude in Meter

District

Zone

1.

Fimkof Himal

6697M

Bajhang

Seti

2.

Fimkof West Peak

6645M

Bajhang

Seti

3.

Radsha Urai Peak

6593M

Bajhang

Seti

4.

Surma-Sarovar, North Peak

6523M

Bajhang

Seti

5.

Api Himal

7132M

Darchula

Mahakali

6.

Api west Himal

7100M

Darchula

Mahakali

7.

Saipal Himal

7031M

Darchula

Mahakali

8.

Saipal, East Himal

6882M

Darchula

Mahakali

9.

Jethi Bahurani Himal

6850M

Darchula

Mahakali

10.

Bobaye Peak

6808M

Darchula

Mahakali

11.

Nampa Peak

6755M

Darchula

Mahakali

12.

Nampa, South Peak

6580M

Darchula

Mahakali

13.

Mt.Rokapi

5467M

Bajhang

Seti

14.

Mt. Korko

6053M

Bajhang

Seti

15.

Mt. Roma

5407M

Bajhang

Seti

16.

Mt. Dhaulagiri

6632M

Bajhang

Seti

17.

Mt. Khiuri Khala

5806M

Bajhang

Seti

18.

Mt. Nampa II

6700M

Bajhang?Darchula

Mahakali/Seti

19.

Mt. Nampa III

6618M

Bajhang/Darchula

Mahakali/Seti

20.

Mt. Yokopahar-(Nampa 7)

6401M

Bajhang/Darchula

Mahakali/Seti

75% Royalty-Free Mountains in Nepal:

Number

Name of the Peak and Mountain

Altitude in Meter

District

Zone

1.

Bhemdang Ri

6150M

Rasuwa

Bagmati

2.

Leonpo Gang (Big White Peak)

6645M

Rasuwa

Bagmati

3.

Gindharva

6248M

Kaski

Gandaki

4.

Gyalzen Peak

6151M

Rasuwa

Bagmati

5.

Bhairab Takura (Madiya Peak)

6799M

Rasuwa

Bagmati

6.

Nepal Peak

6910M

Taplejung

Mechi

7.

Phurbi Chyachu

6631M

Rasuwa

Bagmati

8.

Ohmi Kangn

6829M

Rasuwa

Bagmati

9.

Kirat Chuli (Tent Peak)

7365M

Taplejung

Mechi

10.

Urknmang

6151M

Taplejung

Mechi

11.

Kang Sar Kang

7485M

Kaski

Gandaki

Expedition Permit Fees

Government has recently restructured Royalties of Mountain Climbing permits in Nepal. The changed royalty structure has been implemented since the 1st of January 2015. The objectives of restructuring the royalty fees are in order to stimulate climbing tourism to make competitive with neighboring counties, to promote mountain climbing in remote locations, and to encourage mountaineering/climbing all year round.  

The features of recently changed royalty fees are:

·         The permit fees were discounted to 50% for autumn expeditions than spring and to 25% for winter and summer expeditions.

·          Maximum number of expedition members allowed per expedition was increased from 12 to 15.

·          The individual or small size group is more beneficial with the changed structure

·          Climbing royalty was waved for a period of 5 years for peaks located in mid and far western regions.

·          Incremental royalty system was implemented, whereby the royalty fee is proportional to the number of expedition members replacing the previous flat fee per expedition. 

Climbing Royalty for Foreigner Climbers above 8000 meters in USD.


S.N

Name of The Peak

Spring

Autumn

Winter/Summer

1

Mount Everest (8848 M) Normal route.

$ 11000

$ 5500

$ 2750

2

Mount Everest (8848 M) Other Route

$ 11000

$ 5000

$ 2500

3

Kanchenjunga (8586M)

$ 1800

$ 900

$ 450

4

Lhotse (8516M)

$ 1800

$ 900

$ 450

5

Makalu (8463 M)

$ 1800

$ 900

$ 450

6

ChoYou (8201M)

$ 1800

$ 900

$ 450

7

Dhaulagiri (8167M)

$ 1800

$ 900

$ 450

8

Manalsu (8163M)

$ 1800

$ 900

$ 450

9

Annapurna (8091M)

$ 1800

$ 900

$ 450

10

Shisapangma (8013M)

$ 1800

$ 900

$ 450

 

Climbing Royalty for Foreigner Climbers 7501meter to 7999 Meter in USD.


S.N

Name of the Peak

Spring

Autumn

Winter/Summer

1

Kang Gyachung (7952 M)

$600

$300

$150

2

Annapurna II (7937 M)

$600

$300

$150

3

Kangbachen (7903 M)

$600

$300

$150

4

Himachali E (7893 M)

$600

$300

$150

5

Ngadi Chuli (Peak 29 Dakura) (7871 M)

$600

$300

$150

6

Nuptse (7855 M)

$600

$300

$150

7

Dhaulagiri II (7751 M)

$600

$300

$150

8

Dhaulagiri III (7715 M)

$600

$300

$150

9

Kumbhakarna (Jannu) (7710)

$600

$300

$150

10

Varaha Shikhar (Fang) (7674 M)

$600

$300

$150

11

Dhaulagiri IV (7661 M)

$600

$300

$150

12

Dhaulagiri V (7618 M)

$600

$300

$150

13

Annapurna III (7555 M)

$600

$300

$150

14

Himchuli West (7540 M)

$600

$300

$150

15

Annapurna IV (7525M)

$600

$300

$150

 

Climbing Royalty for Foreigner Climbers 7000 meter to 7500 Meter in USD.


S.N

Name of The Peak

Spring

Autumn

Winter/Summer

1

Khang Sar Kang (7485 M)

$500

$250

$125

2

Jongsang Peak (7483 M)

$500

$250

$125

3

Shartse (7459 M)

$500

$250

$125

4

Mount Gangapurna (7455 M)

$500

$250

$125

5

Gangapurna(7455M)

$500

$250

$125

6

Himchuli N (7371 M)

$500

$250

$125

7

Churen (7371 M)

$500

$250

$125

8

Kirat Chuli(Tent Peak) (7365 M)

$500

$250

$125

9

Gimigela Chuli (7350 M)

$500

$250

$125

10

Pasang Lhamuh (Chuli Jasamba)(7315M)

$500

$250

$125

11

Chamlang (7319 M)

$500

$250

$125

12

Dhaulagiri IV (7268 M)

$500

$250

$125

13

Langtang Lirung (7234 M)

$500

$250

$125

14

Putha Hiunchuli (7246 M)

$500

$250

$125

15

Langtang Ri (7205 M)

$500

$250

$125

16

Gurja Himal (7193 M)

$500

$250

$125

17

Tarke Kang (7193 M)

$500

$250

$125

18

Chamar (7187 M)

$500

$250

$125

19

Manaslu North (7157 M)

$500

$250

$125

20

Pumori (7161 M)

$500

$250

$125

21

Mount Tilicho (7134 M)

$500

$250

$125

22

Gauri Shanker (7134 M)

$500

$250

$125

23

Api Himal (7132 M)

$500

$250

$125

24

Barun Tse (7129 M)

$500

$250

$125

25

Mount Baruntse (7129 M)

$500

$250

$125

26

Pathivara Chuli (7125 M)

$500

$250

$125

27

Himlung Himal (7126 M)

$500

$250

$125

28

Ganesh II (7111 M)

$500

$250

$125

29

Ganesh III (Salasungo)(7110 M)

$500

$250

$125

30

Api West (7100 M)

$500

$250

$125

31

Nilgiri North (7061 M)

$500

$250

$125

32

Ganesh IV (Pabil) (7052 M)

$500

$250

$125

33

Gyajikang (7038 M)

$500

$250

$125

34

Saipal (7031 M)

$500

$250

$125

35

Saipal East (7031 M)

$500

$250

$125

 

Climbing Royalty for Foreigner Climbers 6501 meter to 6999 in USD.


S.N

Name of The Peak

Spring

Autumn

Winter/Summer

1

Ganesh V (6986 M)

$400

$200

$100

2

Kang Guru (6981 M)

$400

$200

$100

3

Leonpa Gang (Big White Peak)(6979M)

$400

$200

$100

4

Dorje Lhakpa (6966 M)

$400

$200

$100

5

Numbur (6957 M)

$400

$200

$100

6

Lemgpa Peak (6954 M)

$400

$200

$100

7

Tukuche Peak (6920 M)

$400

$200

$100

8

Lamjung Himal (6918 M)

$400

$200

$100

9

Ri Gurkarpa (6891M)

$400

$200

$100

10

Jethi Bahurani (6850 M)

$400

$200

$100

11

Nilgiri South (6839 M)

$400

$200

$100

12

Ohmi Kanga (6829 M)

$400

$200

$100

13

Kanijiroba (Main Peak) (6828 M)

$400

$200

$100

14

Cheo Himal (6820 m)

$400

$200

$100

15

Bobaye(6808 M)

$400

$200

$100

16

Drangang Ri (6801M)

$400

$200

$100

17

Bhairab Takura (Madiya Peak) (6799 M)

$400

$200

$100

18

Khatang (6782 M)

$400

$200

$100

19

Kangtega(Kantega) (6779 M)

$400

$200

$100

20

Nampa (6755 M)

$400

$200

$100

21

Cho polu (6711 M)

$400

$200

$100

22

Fimkot (6697 M)

$400

$200

$100

23

Chobuje (6685 M)

$400

$200

$100

24

Baudha (6672 m)

$400

$200

$100

25

Fimkot West (6645 M)

$400

$200

$100

26

Phurbi Chyachu (6631 M)

$400

$200

$100

27

Kande Hiunchuli (6627 M)

$400

$200

$100

28

Thamserku (6623 M)

$400

$200

$100

29

Kanjeralwa (6612 M)

$400

$200

$100

30

Sita Chuchura (6611 M)

$400

$200

$100

31

Raksha Urai (6593 M)

$400

$200

$100

32

Nampa South (6580 M)

$400

$200

$100

33

Changla (6563M)

$400

$200

$100

34

Tripura Hiunchuli (6563 M)

$400

$200

$100

35

Hongde (6556 M)

$400

$200

$100

36

Surma-Sarovar North (6523 M)

$400

$200

$100

37

Tso Karpo (6518 M)

$400

$200

$100

38

Karyolung (6511M)

$400

$200

$100

39

Tawache (6501 M)

$400

$200

$100

 

Climbing Royalty for Foreigner Climbers Less than 6500 Meters in USD.


S.N

Name of The Peak

Spring

Autumn

Winter/Summer

1

Less Than 6500 Meter

$250

$125

$70

 

Climbing Permit for Amadablam Expedition for Foreigner Climbers in USD.


S.N

Mount Amadablam (6812 M)

$400

$400

$200

 

Note: The provision of Royalty for foreign climbers has been effected from 1 January 2015 (B.S. 2071/09/17) 

Rules of Mountaineering

In exercise of the powers conferred by the Government of Nepal, Nepal Mountaineering Association has made the following rules to be observed for the climbing of the peaks of Nepal Himalaya listed in Appendix 1'. These rules will come into force at once.

Definition:

- Where applicable definitions for these rules will be the same as those for the Government of Nepal Mountaineering Expedition Regulations 1979 and its First Amendment 1984.

Permission:

- Any person or mountaineering team desirous of climbing the peak listed in Appendix 1' must receive permission from Nepal Mountaineering Association. Application to climb the peak must be made in the form as prescribed in Appendix 2'. Permission to climb the peaks will be granted for a period of one month only. Permission may be extended, if necessary, for another period of two weeks. The period of permission granted relates to time spent climbing above the base camp. The trek to and from the base camp is not included. Application for a climbing permit may be made at any time by the concerned mountaineering team. The permit will be granted on a first come first serve basis. The right to give permission to another party for climbing the same peak during the same period is reserved by the Nepal Mountaineering Association. Nepal Mountaineering Association will recommend to Immigration Office of Government of Nepal for obtaining trekking permit of the area for the team members.

Payment of fee:

- The climbing fee structure of NMA 18 Trekking Peaks listed in Appendix "1" is as follows:

SN.

Name of the Peaks

Altitude in Meter

Himalayan Range

District

Caravan Rute

1.

Shigu Chuli(Fluted peak)

6501 M

Annapurna Himal

Gandak

ktm-Pkr-Ghorepani-Tadhaani

2.

Mera Peak

6654 M

Khumbu Himal

Sagarmatha

Ktm-jiri-shivalaya- junbasi-nunthala-Kharikhola-poyanbung-chadrabu- kothe-thangna-khar

3.

Kusum Kangru

6367 M

Khumbu Himal

Sagarmatha

ktm-lukla-namche-Thame-Khumjung-B.C.

4.

Kwandge

6011 M

Khumbu Himal

Sagarmatha

Ktm-Lukla-Merala-Randimng-Hunde-B.C.

5.

Chulu West

6419 M

Manang

Gandaki

Ktm-Besisahar-Ngadi-Jagat-Dharapani

6.

Imja-tse(Island Peak)

6160 M

Khumbu Himal

Sagarmatha

ktm-Lukla-Namche-Tyangboche-Pangpoche-Dingboche-chhukang-B.C.

7.

Pharchamo

6187 M

Rolwaling Himal

Janakpur

Ktm-Dolkha-siguti-jagat-simigaon-Chagebukharka-Beding-Na-B.C.

8.

Lobuje

6119 M

Khumbu Himal

Sagarmatha

Ktm-Lukla-Namche-Thame-RermoPokhari-Gokya-dzonghla-B.C.

9.

Ramdung

5925 M

Rolwaling Himal

Janakpur

Ktm-dolkha-Siguti-GongerDoranangbu-Beding-Na-Kabung-Kydug-Kongma-Drolmaban- Tashi Lapcha-B.C.

10.

Pisang

6091 M

Manang

Gandaki

Ktm-Beshisahar-Bahundanda-Chamja-Bagarchhap-Chame- Pisang B.C.

11.

Tharpu Chuli (Tent Peak)

5663 M

Annapurna Himal


Gandaki

ktm-Pokhara-Dhampus-Langdrung- Ghandrung-Chomoro-Kuldi-B.C.

12.

Khongma-tse(Mehara Peak)

5849 M

Khumbu Himal

Sagarmatha

Ktm-Lukla-Namche-Dole-Mechermo-gokyo-Dughala-B.C.

13.

Ganja-la Chuli(Naya Kanga)

5844 M

Langtang Himal

Bagmati

Ktm-Dhunche-Sysbru Goan- Lama hotel-Kyanjin Gomba-Ganjala B.C.

14.

Pokhalde

5806 M

Khumbu Himal

Sagarmatha

Ktm-Lukla-Namche-Dole-Gokya-Na-Thagna Cholapass B.C.

15.

Mardi Himal

5587 M

Annapurna Himal

Gandaki

Ktm-Pokhara-Hyangia-Dhiprang- Kharka-Mardi Basi Camp

16.

Paldor

5896 M

Langtang Himal

Bagmati

Ktm-Dhading-Ankhu khola-Rigaon-JAralang-Sertung-Krarka-somdang

17.

Hiunchuli

6441 M

Annapurna

Gandaki

Ktm-Pokhara-Chomrong-Bamboo-BC

18.

Chulu East

6584

Damodar

Gandaki

Ktm-Beisahar-Ngadi-Jagat-Dharapani-BC


For extending permission, an additional 25% charge of the total amount of the initial fee will be made for each extra week. The leader or climbing member of the team must collect the permit in person from Nepal Mountaineering Association. The maximum number of people in a group is 12 pax.
 

Refund:

- In the event of cancellation of the permission by NMA or the failure of the expedition to materialize due to some other reasons, the feels already paid will not be refunded. Every individual or party granted a climbing permit shall be accompanied by a Sirdar/Guide, who must be registered with NMA.

Functions and duties of the Sirdar/Guide:

·         To assist the climbing party with the recruitment of porters and other staff, control of porters, local purchase of food, etc. And to solve any problem that may arise to the best of his ability.

·         To report to the Nepal Mountaineering Association in case the party spends more than the prescribed time limit in the mountain.

·         To ensure that the climbers comply with the terms of their permit.

·         To ensure that the climbers (trekkers) follow the specified route.

·         To ensure proper disposal of waste materials.

·         To report to NMA any infringement of the climbing rules

·         To report any serious incidents to the nearest police post.

 

Employment Conditions of the Sirdar/Guide:

·         The Sirdar Guide shall be employed from the day the climbing party begins the trek until the trek is finished. The Sirdar/Guide will be provided with the following facilities

·         Minimum daily allowance to be paid as per the rules of Government of Nepal, Ministry of Tourism, and Civil Aviation.

·         Food and tent accommodation.

·         Climbing equipment and necessary clothing if required to go above the base camp.

 

Insurance of the Sirdar/Guide:

·         All employees going above the base camp must be insured for personal accident to the value of Rs. 200,000.00.

 

Nomination of representative in Kathmandu:

·         Each party granted climbing permit will nominate representative in Kathmandu to act as liaison between NMA and the climbing party. The representative may be an individual or an organization registered with NMA. The nominated representative will be responsible for making necessary arrangements for the climbing party in case of accidents or any other unforeseen circumstances.

 

Submission of the report:

·         On the conclusion of the climb and on return to Kathmandu, the party will submit a report to NMA. in the form prescribed in Appendix 4'.

 

Power to cancel the permit:

·         NMA may cancel or withdraw the climbing permit any time with or without showing any particular reason.

 

Non-compliance with the regulation:

·         Where any trekking party acts in contravention to the climbing permit or indulges in acts of unsocial or outrageous behavior contrary to the customs and culture of the people of Nepal, NMA may recommend to Government of Nepal to take necessary measures in accordance with the article 37 of Mountaineering Regulations 1979.

 

Protection of Environment:

·         Base camp and other camps will be left perfectly clean at the conclusion of the climb. No foreign materials, such as fixed rope, pitons, etc shall be left on the mountain. All rubbish and waste material must be burnt or otherwise disposed of.

 

Revision of the Regulations:

·         Any article of this regulation may be revised or amended by NMA with the prior permission of the Government of Nepal.

Essential Climbing gears and equipment

This list should be considered as an essential summary and, naturally, it might be incomplete. Expeditioners are encouraged to conduct further study and practical exercises to familiarize themselves with the equipment. You should also be familiar with the medical terminology and have a basic understanding of medical conditions related to high elevation, cold, wind, excessive sun radiation as well as injuries likely to sustain in the outdoor situations, particularly in high and remote mountainous areas. While most of this will only be relevant in emergency situations – which we all hope never to encounter –it’s better to come over-prepared; your life might depend on it.

Essential Personal Climbing Gear:

·         Alpine Climbing Harness: A good climbing harness should be light and simple in design, easy to put on and take off with gloves on, with positively foolproof locking features.

·         Crampons: Crampons must fit boots perfectly; steel crampons with anti-balling and ability to toe point positively and safely into ice. The lighter the better – extra weight on your feet is much more strenuous than anywhere else on your body.

·         Ice ax: The ice ax should be versatile and light. A general-purpose technical ice ax (T rated) but not too aggressive.

·         Ascender: Ascender or Jamar, a mechanical device used for ascending on a rope; must be suitable to be used with gloves or mittens. Practice using it with thick gloves on again and again.

·         Multi-LED Head Lamp: Multi-LED Head Lamp and spare batteries are essential; we do not recommend single bulb lights due to lower reliability

·         Carabineers: Minimum 2 locking carabiners, 1 large and 1 small, and 4 regular.

·         Rappel device: Figure 8, ACT or similar; be familiar with Munter Hitch as it may save your life if you lose your rappel device (which happens a lot)

·         Trekking poles: Very handy for the approach; adjustable types are the best (preferably with a simple outside locking mechanism)

·         Slings: One 3m(10ft) and three 2m(6ft)

·         Prusik loops: Never hurts to carry a few (e.g. 0.6m and 1.2m), they come in handy in many situations

·         Masks, hoses, and regulators: Good quality for your safety.

·         Altimeter: ABC watch or more advanced GPS watches will do the trick. Watch for battery life

·         Climbing helmet: A climbing helmet is essential safety gear for crossing areas under rocks and ice cliffs; lightweight is essential.

Clothing

For undergarments, we recommend Merino wool  – or one of the new mixtures between Merino and synthetics (Icebreaker and Odlo are two highly recommended brands).Quality, as well as comfort, are essential in extreme conditions so don’t look for cheap options. Merino wool is popular because of its softness and breath-ability while providing excellent insulation. It can absorb water very well and takes moisture away from the body which keeps you dry and warm. It has natural antibacterial properties, so it stays usable for much longer. 

Upper Body:

·         1-2 (medium insulation) short-sleeve Merino shirt(e.g. Icebreaker Merino 150 or lightweight 200, Odlo Revolution medium)

·         2 long-sleeve Merino shirts (e.g. Icebreaker Merino 150 and/or 200 or Odlo Revolution, one medium and one thick)

·         One fleece pullover, medium weight.

·         One fleece jacket.

·         One hardshell waterproof Gore-Tex jacket with a large hood to accommodate the climbing helmet. The Arc’teryx SV range is expensive but offers excellent wind and water protection. 

·         Lightweight down jacket for chilly days in base camp or warm layer when stopping for short breaks.

·         One very warm expedition grade goose-down (duvet) jacket with hood or a down suit if you prefer, for high altitude use (e.g. Northface, Rab, etc.)

Note: Your clothing should be kept dry using waterproof stuff sacks (preferably made of Cordura) or alternatively bin-liners or large plastic bags although they are less rugged.

Hands:

·         One pair of lightweight liner gloves. These will be worn when tying knots etc.

·         Mitten: Gore-Tex Over-mitts (that block the wind) matched with the very warm down mitts, spare mitts might also be useful (For instance, Mountain Equipment Redline)

Head:

·         Warm wool or synthetic  hat that covers your ears

·         Balaclava or face mask

·         Scarf or neck sleeve

·         a Bandana or headscarf is useful for dusty conditions 

·         Ballcap or brimmed sun cap

·         Glacier Sunglass with side shields (2x)

·         One pair of ski goggles (optional with light and dark lens) for windy conditions

Lower Body:

·         Merino underwear briefs (Icebreaker, Odlo etc.)

·         One pair of walking shorts (optional)

·         One pair of walking trousers for trekking and around camp

·         Two pair thermal Merino bottoms (Icebreaker 150 or 200 or Odlo Revolution)

·         One pair of very thick thermal Merino bottoms (Icebreaker 200, Odlo Revolution Thick)

·         One pair of polar fleece trousers or similar mid-layer trousers

·         One pair of Gore-Tex (over)trousers or bibs. Waterproof/breathable with full side zips

·         One pair of Goose-down trousers or bibs. You may prefer a down suit (Northface, Rab, etc.)

Feet:

·         One pair of plastic boots suitable for >8000m. (For instance La Sportiva Olympus Mons, Millet or equivalent good quality plastic shells with inner boots; avoid tight fit with heavy socks)

·         One pair of sturdy leather or synthetic (Gore-Tex) hiking boots with good ankle support for the walk to base camp

·         One pair of cross-trainers, running shoes, and/or sandals for Kathmandu and in camp

·         One pair of down booties (optional but convenient)

·         Two pair med-heavy poly or wool socks

·         Two Pairs of liner socks. Polypropylene or wool

·         Vapor barrier liner socks or plastic bread-bags (a matter of preference)

·         Two pair lightweight trekking socks, poly or wool

·         Light Merino wool or cotton socks for in town

Travel and Sleeping Gear

Rucksacks and Travel Bags:

·         One medium rucksack (50-70 l), can be used for airplane carry as well)

·         Two large (120 l) duffle kit bags for clothing and equipment, must be durable for use on pack animals

·         Small padlocks for duffel kit bags

Sleeping Gear:

·         One down sleeping bag for high altitude (rated to –35 C (-30 F). In the high camp, you can sleep in your own clothing inside your sleeping bag.

·         For base camp, one (additional) sleeping bag (normal rating to about-15C to-20 C (-5 F)).

·         At least 3 closed cell foam mats for use in base camp in the higher camps (Thermarest offers an excellent lightweight one with decent insulation values) – inflatable mats are not recommended as they are more prone to failure and provide almost no insulation if not properly inflated.

Note: Your sleeping bags should be kept dry using a waterproof stuff sack

 

Medical

Personal Hygiene:

·         Personal hygiene supplies;

·         Two tubes lip sun cream, at least 1 large tube regular sun cream (min. factor 30), some after-sun lotion in case you do get a sunburn

·         Anti-mosquito cream;

·         One toothpaste/brush set;

·         One hand sanitizer gel

·         1 (fast drying) synthetic towel

Medical Supplies:

·         Small personal first-aid kit; (Simple and Light): first-aid tape, plasters (band-aids), alcohol-free wipes for cuts, personal medications, etc. (The leaders will have more extensive first-aid kits)

·         Personal prescription medications; Please let your leader know about any medical issues before the climb.

·         One skin blister repair kit

Useful Medication: (Always contact your doctor if you have any questions; use alternatives in case you have intolerances for the suggested medication)

·         Anti-diarrhea pills (Imodium) (one regular package)

·         Anti-headache medication (Aspirin or Ibuprofen) (one regular package)

·         One small bottle of cough and/or cold medicine.

·         One course antibiotics for stomach infection, available locally at chemist shop or pharmacy with no doctor's prescription.

·        Antibiotics for a chest infection, available locally at chemist shop or pharmacy with no doctor's prescription.

·         One small bottle of anti-altitude sickness medication: Diamox (Acetazolamide), available locally, for more about this medication, please contact us or your doctor

·         One small bottle of water purification tablets (needs to contain silver-ions AND chlorine) or a water filter or UV sterilizer.

·         Earplugs

·         Extra prescription glasses/contact lens. Contact lens wearers, please bring glasses in case of emergency.

Note: Do not bring sleeping pills as they act as respiratory depressants which is problematic at high altitude. 

Oxygen

While some climbers in Everest want to try to achieve without extra oxygen, most participants want to provide oxygen. Only extra oxygen is available to participants of Everest climbing. How much oxygen one demands is an individual decision; others want 1 tube, some want 12; we only need at least one oxygen bottle for personal use for each expedition team member, which is at least an emergency supply to ascend to Camp 4. Five oxygen bottles are typically appropriate for an average climber from our experience. All the equipment fits well together with simple threaded and Snap-On fixtures which need no tools and is easy to use. The unused oxygen bottles and masks, hose, and regulatory authorities are in excellent shape and we have a 40% buying agreement. 

Exercise specifications

You must be in incredibly strong physical condition if you want to ascend Everest. Basic fitness preparation should start way ahead, at least 12 months ago, with a focus on aerobic education (as long as you're an amateur athlete and ready for challenging athletic exercises). You will increase the heart's oxygen ability to provide adequate oxygen to your muscles and brain tissues at very low partial oxygen demand. Aerobic exercise is the best for this kind of climbing extreme sports. High altitude acclimatization both relies on cardiovascular ability and the capacity of your personal physiology change, which is only found when you are 8000 m above sea level. No matter how fit they are in the water, a limited percentage of people would not be able to adapt or risk problems at high altitudes. However, the better your health, the better your odds of getting to the top.  

Risks and problems of altitude

The reduction in partial oxygen pressure is the primary issue for mountain climbers as the altitude rises. The gas level that includes our air reduces at a higher altitude. The partial pressure is a gas in a gas blend if the same area was filled by this gas only (hypothetical pressure). A partial reduction of oxygen pressure means that every amount of air is less oxygen. 

The gas pressure in the blood (known as the Blood Gas tension) and the external atmosphere have a fine equilibrium, such that the lungs can consume oxygen and carry it to your organs. At about 9000 m, you won't be able to consume much oxygen with a predictable effect. The external pressure is lowered at altitude. At low altitudes, our body has grown well, and at high elevations, it does not perform.

Low oxygen levels in the blood can lead to a variety of conditions which are commonly summed up as AMS. This is easy to do and reversible when handled immediately (reduce altitude as soon as possible after treatment). However, it can lead to more severe conditions (and likely fatal) such as High Altitude Cerebral Edema and High Altitude Pulmonary Edema (HAPE). In addition, low blood oxygen levels will contribute to frostbite and hypothermia induced by thermal inefficiencies in the body. Thrombosis and embolism are other disorders caused by high altitude impact.

At high altitudes, there is a high chance of sunburn due to lower UV absorption by the atmosphere and snow reflections. Since you cannot totally keep away from the heat, the condition will get worse. Always cover the skin and use a lot of sunscreens as much as possible from the sun. More apparent threats include broken bones because of falling, avalanches, ice, and rocks, etc. But in your past mountain experiences, you may have faced them.